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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
newsworthy of large type headlines. two days after she resigned, rebekah brooks walked into a police station for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this
murdoch, james murdoch and rebekah brooks on how much they knew about these phone hacking allegations and when did they know it and why didn't they put a stop to it sooner or be more forthcoming. they told lawmakers earlier it was one rogue reporter, an isolated incident and it didn't did any further than that. we know of course that it turns out that thousands of people may have had phone mail messages hacked and lawmakers want to get to the bottom of how much each of them knew. >> the other question is this whistle-blower found dead yesterday tragically. police are looking into that. what is the latest there? >> reporter: what we know is that basically police have confirmed that a man was found dead at his apartment. that man is believed to be the whistle-blower for news of the world. he confirmed that the editor of the paper not only knew about the phone hacking but actively encouraged it from his reporters. he was the only whistle-blower to really go public and confirm that this was the case. now, what we understand from police is that he was found dead at his apartment while his
and small question. would you agree, ms. brooks, that part of the public concern here is about the closeness of the police and now politicians to "news of the world" and "news international?" >> i think that the public's concern overwhelmingly is the on the interception of voice mails is the idea that anybody could intercept the voice mails of victims of crime, and i think that is the overwhelming concern. >> but there has been a lot of concern voiced over the closeness of the police and the politicians and the "news of the world" and "news international" wouldn't you agree as a matter of fact? >> well, i have seen that "news of the world" has been singled out for that closeness so if you are going to address this and you know this more than anyone on the committee, because of your career as a journalist that it is wholly unfair in the discussing the closeness of police and politicians with the media to single out the "news of the world." >> well, it is a fact, and this has been a criticism and yet, you are on your watch as chief executive of "news international" have a triple whammy, becaus
by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers at news corp. may be advising against this because of course there is a police investigation going on at the moment and public pressure may not be the best thing for them to be under a at the moment. >> do we know clearly whether or not parliament has the power in any way to compel the likes of rupert or indeed james murd
by trying to throw a plate of shaving cream at rupert murdoch. following the murdoch's rebecca brook who's resign head of operations last friday and arrest and questions by police on sunday. brooks, a former editor of news f the world denied prior alaltions but apologized to the victims. >> it was cruel and i have regrets. just the idea that phone access was by someone of the news of the world is abhorrent to me as it is to everyone in this room and it's ultimate regret the speed in which we have found out and tried to find out the bottom of the investigations have been too slow. i think james a rupert both accepted that earlier and we're endeavoring to continue to continue to investigate. but of course there are regrets. don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorized no sanction approval for anyone listening to the voice mails of those circumstances. i don't know anyon who would think it was the right and proper thing to do at this time or at any time. >> charlie: also appearing s sir paul hnson the head of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arre
on the face of it, that the news of the world was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international >> i advocated at the time that this was a step we should take. this was a paper and a title that had fundamentally violated the trust of its readers, and it's something that was a matter of great regret, real gravity, but under the circumstances, and with respect to the bad things that certain of the things that happened at the "american's "nee world" some years ago, it was the right choice for the paper to cease publication. it is important to note and i want to be clear with the committee on this. that the company is doing everything it can to make sure that journalists and staff at the "news of the world" who had nothing to do with any of these issues, who are completely blameless in any of these things, and many are, you know, really have done tremendous work journalistically, that we find reemployment for them anywhere we k. the company is being as generous as we can under the circumstances. the company is being as thoughtful and compassionate for
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
to the number three spot in the company. and then there is rebekah brooks, a rupert murdoch protege. she was a top executive before she resigned on friday. she was arrested a couple of days later. let's get straight to london to atika shubert. these witnesses are not under subpoena. they don't have to say a word, do they? >> no. they don't, but it's still a court and can be held in tempt of court for example. even though there is no particular oath here, there is an incredible amount of pressure on them to answer these questions. remember, particularly in the cases of james murdoch and rebekah brooks, they have told lawmakers in previous hearings the this was the end of it. it was a rogue reporter and a private investigator and that was the end of it. clearly, it was not. because it turns out that there are, in fact, thousands of phone mail messages that may have been hacked and now they are back in front of lawmakers again trying to explain why they didn't tell the full story the first time around. >> atika, we have been paying close attention to this since early this morning. you know
of the world." >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" laid fairly and square leon the management of the newspaper, which would include you. is that the case? >> i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said is exactly how it was. it was a collective decision. we all talked together, and mr. murdoch was in with the board at the time, >> yes, rupert murdoch, yes. >> during the private session i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, and clearly and quite rightly the journalists on the "news of the world" who are very honorable and journalists who will been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for a longtime and with great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's decision to close the paper. what i was saying to them is that right now you may not be able to right at this moment understand why we've done it, but i thi
in order to try to protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. in effect, rather than her being -- having her departure being announced, "the news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing "the news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight, do you wish you accepted her resignation to start with in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the pain of people that will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated, absolutely sxl totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the uk and said your priority for rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i said that. i was quoted as saying that. i had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth, so i'm not sure what i said. >> you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i think it's important -- i'm sorry, mr. chairman. >> yes. >> mr. davis, it's important to know the
from rebekah brooks. if you see it he was trying to get a pie in the face of rupert murdoch. if we can get that shot back up again, you can see in niz left hand a tin -- and see if we can get that shot back up. it looks like he had a tin in his left hand a cream pie that he was going to smash in the face of rupert murdoch during these hearings. the man was quickly taken away in handcuffs. you saw the images of him outside he had something all over his face. wendy dang in the pink jumping up. she is a volleyball player. that looks like a spike. she's known to be a fan of volleyball. anyway, you can see the pie right there trying to get in the face of rupert murdoch. the woman in the gray i'm not sure who she is. she was sitting to the left op of wendy dang. michelle is with us now. is this ovenly some type of protesters coming in to disrupt this and create a true embarrassment to rupert murdoch by delivering a pie in the face? >> we guess. we're basically looking at the exact same pictures that you are. and we're seeing a feed from all over sources here in the uk. it's the same picture
and gave a full and sincere apology. >> rupert and james murdoch and rebecca brooks will be forced to appear here in a committee and grill eed closelily politicians who want answers as to how all of this activity went on. one of the people who will be interrogating rebecca brooks had some tough words for her. >> i think he was inevitable. rebecca brooks has given the resignation message she should have given on day one of this scandal when nick davis of the uk "guardian" revealed milly's phone had been hacked. >> but the political dimensions continue to evolve as well. downing street has been forced to put out a list of guests that the prime minister david cameron welcomed to his country residents checkers. mo among them was the now disgraced former editor of "the news of the world." a man hired as director of communications. he visited the prime minister three months after he was forced to step down from that high profile political role. wolf? >> dan rivers in london, much more on this story coming up later. meanwhi meanwhile, libyan rebels locked in heated battle while gadhafi's
. it's the type of story rebecca brooks would have loved when he edited the sun or "news of the world." now the exchief followed the murdoches into the committee room and matched their contrition. >> it seems like you were so unaware of such fundamental issues -- >> in some ways i think the opposite. i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize no sanctioned approval, anyone listening to the voice mails under those circumstances. i don't know anyone who would think it was the right and proper thing to do. >> but someone did it, approved it and covered it up. when rupert murdoch swept out of westminster we were no closer to knowing who. we do know this was a day he did not enjoy. >> well, the impact of rupert murdoch news corporation reaches far beyond the u.k. his company was born in australia in 1952 as news limited which today is about 70% of australian numerous. we're joined by a professor at the university of sydney. he joins me now. thank you for joining us. what did you make of the hearings? >> it was like late-night football here. i thought the statement i know n
with rebekah brooks, the chief executive but we're told that they were appropriate but don't know what the content is yet. i don't want to get too bogged down in the detail. the short answer is not at the moment. i don't think anyone's talking about him being in a perilous position yet. this is slowly incrementally getting closer and closer to downing street's door. it is very, very awkward for the prime minister. it's taken up a lot of his time and put him in a difficult position. i think he's desperately hoping after today's combative exchanges in the house of commons behind me, this will be a line drawn under it. it will then go back to the police inquiry. this lot the politicians will be off on their summer holidays and i would think david cameron will be hoping this will be off his initial sort of entree for the summer and he can concentrate on other things. >> let's revisit rupert murdoch's testimony. refusing to take any responsibility for this phone hacking scandal. take a quick peek. >> do you accept that ultimately, you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you're
. >>> this morning former editor of "news of the world" rebecca brooks is out of jail. meanwhile scotland yard's top cop resigned amid the phone hacking scandal in great britain. the head of the london police department, sir paul stevenson, resigned. he quit under intense pressure after it was revealed that scotland yard hired a former editor as a media consultant. that editor has also been arrested in connection with the scandal. >> i and the people who know me know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we'd have done some things differently, but i'll not lose any sleep over my personal integri integrity. >> british lawmakers are preparing to grill rupert and james murdoch. a parliamentary committee will question the duo about the scandal tomorrow. >>> today money will be flowing at the white house in the form of the nation's most prominent billionaires. president obama is hosting warren buffett and bill and melinda gates along with other members of the giving pledge. the giving pledge was founded by buffett and the gates family last year. it encourages america's wealthiest citizens to
. >> rebekah brooks, her testimony yesterday said the company acted quickly and concisely in the hacking scandal. but she's been arrested by police. how did she do? >> she looked pretty shifty to me at all of the commons hearing evidence yesterday. i didn't quite believe a word she said. once more, what said was plainly not true because she didn't cure it early. as we know, news executives who could it be aside from rebekah brooks stood in way of the investigation. did everything to make sure it was killed off early. >> what about andy coulson? we talk about the impact on cameron, did cameron throw him under the bus? >> he tried to, but i suspect coulson is in a position to dump on all the news corp. people if he wants to. he can strie to implicate other people. >> what about john yates? he's criticized for shutting down the original phone hacking investigation. i'm reminded of that show "star trek" that every time an officer was at the party he was going to get killed. >> i guess he's the most obvious fall guy. on the other hand i think he was a roughly honest cop. the reason he closed
former bosses, rebekah brooks, andy coulson who are arrested, not criminal masterminds but engaged in a media empire where criminality was rif, if that media empire got david cameron elected as the british prime minister, that's a good story. >> i have a break coming up. since you mentioned rebekah brooks and andy coulson, both former editors of "news of the world," do you have any doubt that they knew phone hacking was going on at that paperer? >> i have no doubt whatsoever. piers morgan was also my editor, but in that time in 1994-'5, it wasn't illegal. you could sit outside someone's house and tap into their phone conversations and record all of it. and also look at their messages. i need to ask a lawyer actually, is it legal for a wife to hack into her husband's phone if she thinks he's cheating? about 10% of the population of britain have done that, too sgle well ooh keep our focus on journalists. paul mcmull land, good luck with the pub. >> thanks. >>> coming up on the second part of "reliable sources," debt talks collapse after news reports of a deal. how much of the press i
hacking scandal. he and his son james and former news corp. executive rebekah brooks were grilled today. the elder murdoch apologizing but refusing to take the rap. >> do you feel that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> nope. >> you're not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it. and then maybe the people they trusted. >> no apology and no stepping down. >> have you considered resigning? >> >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who, i don't know what level. have let me down. and i think they have behaved disgracefully and betrayed the company and me. and it's for them to pay. i think that frankly i'm the best person to clean this up. >> and speaking of cleaning up, the proceedings were interrupted briefly when a protestor deliver a shaving cream pie. take a look at this. keep your eye on the lower left-hand corner of your screen. it happens pretty quickly. >> oh! >> here it is quickly again in slow motion. here comes the pie. and that pink blur that you see over there is rupert murdoch's wife wendy wh
than 100"÷"÷ million homes."÷"÷ created by cable, provided as a÷ public service."÷"÷ >>> rebecca brooks, the former"÷ chief executive of news"÷"÷ international, testified earlie÷ this week before a house of"÷"÷ commons committee. she"÷"÷ was questioned on her knowledge of phone hacking at"÷÷ "news of the world," alleged"÷"÷ payments made to police officers and to celebrity victims of"÷"÷ hacking. she was"÷"÷ also asked about"÷"÷ tampering with the voicemail of a teenage murder victim. >> we've now come to the second part of our session. i'd like to welcome ms. be rebecca brooks, recent chief executive officer at news international, and i'd like to thank you for your willingness to come before the committee. we are very much aware there is an ongoing police investigation which could lead to further proceedings, and we will bear that in mind, but we also appreciate your statement when you resigned from the company that you wanted to be as helpful as possible to various inquiries that are underway. could i just start then. news international issued a statement when you we
for information. they will be joined by rebecca brooks. she is the chief executive of news international, and was the editor of nice of the world, the sunday tabloid at the time it allegedly hired a detective to hack into the voice mail of an abducted school girl who was later murdered. rupert and james murdoch initial declined to go before the committee citing prior engagements with you offering to cooperate at a later date. but a formal summons arrived, and that happened here in london. so they have decided to go. >> day by day this has become worse for them. it's engulfed them in a way and there has been a sense of meltdown around them. they have some really difficult questions to face. >> reporter: reportedly the fine has opened an investigation in the united states to determine whether or not of any news corp's entities hacked into the voicemail systems of victims of 9/11. alisyn: the debt showdown, why seniors could be at risk and what it means for the average american. we'll go in-depth. >> if you are with the president and the vision of a government that continues to live or stro
of pieces of that and told me he became a suspect. >> you were told rebecca brooks would be arrested? >> yes. >> how long before? >> 80 ten days? >> two days? >> i can't remember. but that is entirely proper. >> can we stick to resignations? [talking over each other] [inaudible] >> i was simply trying to ensure that the exchanges between the employment of mr. coulson, why would i want to risk anyone being accused of any compromise? i would not suggest for one moment -- why would i risk that compromise? my understanding is the advice from the senior official in number 10 and it is very sensible not to compromise people or leave a suggestion of compromise? >> it is not a question of keeping it secret from the home secretary. as commissioner of the metropolitan police, very substantial salary, you have great responsibilities and your predecessors had to tell the prime minister a lot of unpleasant things for many years. why is it this was a matter that you felt was something that you couldn't disclose? >> we were it is negative. let me remind you, wallace becoming a name in regards to packing, f
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)